Skip to main content

I Will Not Sink

I will not sink.

  • I will participate in positive, professional dialogue.
  • I will not seek a platform for attention based on negativity or mudslinging.
  • I will avoid listening to gossip about others, and I will not repeat it if I hear it, nor will I give credence to it.
  • I will attempt to turn negative conversations to other topics by injecting a positive insight or suggesting a new topic of conversation.
  • I will walk away from conversations if I cannot participate conscientiously in them and if I cannot effect change.
  • I will seek to find the positive in all situations and people.
  • I will seek conversations and relationships that will focus on growth and positive situations.
  • I will not hide my struggles, but I will address them with honesty and humility, and I will not use my struggles as occasions to harm others.


I will not sink.

    Why is it so much easier to talk about negative things? Why are we attracted to the negative: criticism, complaining, gossip? I think it makes us feel better about ourselves, or superior to others, and we like that.


    Why do conversations focus on negative items far more often than positive ones? A young teacher and I were talking. I told her that we had a great job and that we had a lot of good students. She stopped me there and told me that she doesn’t hear this anywhere else. Her colleagues were always negative, always critical, always focused on the down side.

Isn’t that a sad statement?

    I have been drawn to Twitter as a great source of professional development and encouragement. I have made clear boundaries for myself. I will not participate in negative or critical discussions. I will be honest about my struggles as a teacher, in order to grow and help others grow, but I will not be negative or argumentative. I will not sink. If people I follow begin to Tweet negative, critical comments, become argumentative, or advocate base discussion, behavior or language, I “unfollow” them. I will not sink.

    When I was student teaching my cooperating teacher told me, “Stay away from the faculty room”. I didn’t know what he meant. Then we went down for lunch a few days. The teachers gathered there chose to spend thirty minutes criticizing their spouses, their children, their colleagues, their administrators, and their students. I left depressed. Is this how it always is? No, sometimes I could hear gossip. <Disclaimer: not ALL faculty rooms are like this, and not ALL teachers in faculty rooms are like this--I am generalizing--using an example with which many people can relate.>

So I ask: What will you do to keep from sinking? 



  • Will you participate in positive, professional dialogue?
  • Will you not seek a platform for attention based on negativity or mudslinging?
  • Will you avoid listening to gossip about others, and not repeat it if you hear it, nor give credence to it?
  • Will you attempt to turn negative conversations to other topics by injecting a positive insight or suggesting a new topic of conversation?
  • Will you walk away from conversations if you cannot participate conscientiously in them and if you cannot effect change?
  • Will you seek to find the positive in all situations and people?
  • Will you seek conversations and relationships that will focus on growth and positive situations?
  • Will you not hide your struggles, but address them with honesty and humility, and not use your struggles as occasions to harm others?




What if we try it together? What if we drown out the negative with positive? What if we incorporate professional dialogue into our profession? What if we find the positive and celebrate that? What if we walk away from the negative? 


I will not sink.





Comments

  1. It would be wonderful to develop a system to help each other not sink by reminding each other when we are indulging in nonproductive negative output.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, the power of accountability. It requires a foundation of relationships based on deep trust and respect. It is a great goal to seek. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Finishing the School Year: Grace in Action

The school year is nearly ended. Teachers and students are tired.
     Nerves are frayed.
          Patience is in small supply.
               Demands are high but energy is low.
                    Some students seem to know just how                              to push us                                     beyond                                           our ability                                                 to cope.
How can we finish the year strongly?Resolve to love every student: love is an ACT OF THE WILL, not an emotion.Extend grace to forgive and extend trust to students again. Believe in and encourage the best in each student TODAY, regardless of yesterday.Provide opportunities for each student to taste success.As the school year closes, let us commit to extending grace again and again. Our toughest students are the ones who most need our patient endurance and gentle guidance.
Might we not need to practice these with our colleagues and family well?Certainly they will nee…

Twelve Little Gifts, Thirteen Melted Hearts

My 8th period Spanish 1 class keeps me on my toes; I’ve determined that we are together at the end of the day, not for Spanish (though we do that, too), but for “Life”. Twelve young men and women and I are learning how to navigate life together, facing our difficulties and finding ways to overcome them.
We learn how to behave in a classroom setting. It should be obvious, but I’m learning not to assume. What is most important, and why? How does your behavior affect your academic success? How does your behavior affect others?
We learn how to work with each other, and this requires extensive training. At times it’s like “Boot Camp”: training, retraining, practice, retraining, a few more gray hairs, practice, retraining, repeat. This is how you ensure that everyone can take part This is how you express opinion without tearing down your classmate This is WHY you learn to work with others
We learn the importance of completing tasks, and completing them well. Responsibility is learned, not ingra…

I Won't Give Up, Will You?

During the first week of school two years ago I overheard this comment: "My sister says that if she (referring to me) gives me any ****, she will come in and **** her!" If those "terms of endearment" were any indication, I was in for an interesting year!
Relationships require forgiveness.
"Sarah" came to class each day defiant. She swore at the drop of a hat, pushed for her own way, antagonized her classmates, and kept us from any moments of peace. But Sarah wasn't alone. She had several accomplices, students who were determined to disrupt, cause chaos, and demonstrate their independence and self-importance.

Each day was a challenge. Several times I deflected fights, and once had to have assistance for other teachers when Sarah and two other girls shouted obscenities and threats at one another.

All my attempts failed, at least with Sarah and company.

Relationships require patience.
One of my best assets in the classroom is patience. I believe that I am…